Pitching the Way They Like It: Creative Pitching for Radio

Need to get your client on radio? Have you pitched and followed up 17 times by email and phone calls? What do your pitches look like? Are they boring and wordy? Do you say the same thing every single time?

In this fast paced world of social media and multiple pathways of communication with all kind of people, our pitches need to be fast paced, versatile, and exciting.
Whether you’re pitching via Twitter, sending a good old fashioned email, or leaving a voicemail, your message needs to be crystal clear, interesting, direct, and straight to the point. These kinds of pitches are going to get you more results.

Knowing how your contact likes to be pitched is important, but pitching them something they’ll want to read is even more important. It doesn’t matter what your subject matter is – whether it’s a niche topic or breaking news – what matters is how you deliver the news.

A good subject or headline will get them interested. Using a bullet pointed list to clearly layout the 3-5 main points will immediately let them know what you’re pitching and what you want them to do about it. This straight-to-the-point, crystal clear style of pitching applies to any topic or theme and will help your client’s message be seen and heard by those who can get it heard on the airwaves.

Once you have a clear message and an engaging style, you can use the power of multiple platforms to get through to your producer or host. Send an email, follow up with a phone call, then try a quick contact through Twitter or Facebook. Don’t be pushy or annoying, just be available through any avenue that person uses to get pitches. Just like in marketing, you need to be talking where your audience is listening and pitching in the way they like to be pitched.

The moral of our story is that the successful publicist must write pitches that will get results and then must get those pitches out in various ways. Our publicists have not only perfected these principles, but continue the follow up with pleasant persistence until we get an answer. Patience, positivity, and hard work pay off.

Blending media: the Art of a Good Book Tour

By Booth Media Group

When you write a new book, it’s a beautiful thing, a fresh creation, a message for the world. And writing it is certainly the hard part. After all, you’ve put in hours, brain cells, and probably a few tears into those pages. The editing and revising process was soul-numbing, and your editor is your best friend and arch nemesis all at once. But finally, the book is done and on the digital shelves of your nearest Amazon.com.

So what’s next?

The next step is somehow to let the public know your book is ready for them to buy and read and love. This step has many facets and options. One option is to go on a book tour. Variations on a traditional book tour that are a bit more affordable for most new authors are the virtual book tour and doing one major event in your hometown. All three of these options follow the general outline below. They will all help you launch your book. Combining these tours and events with as many key radio shows as possible, plus offering an article on a newsworthy topic that connects to your book to daily newspapers and key monthly publications can really help spread your net of visibility.

A traditional book tour means that you will travel into various cities and go to various venues, usually book stores, read little excerpts from your book, and then answer questions. Ideally, you’ll also do radio, tv, and get print coverage in these cities to promote your book and events.

In your head you’re probably imagining cozy rooms full of earnest and interested people all giving you their undivided attention and then flocking to the cash register to buy your book which you will sign with a pithy saying and your best autograph. But reality can be very, very different.

Often, bookstore events draw just a few people. A “crowd” is when people who aren’t your family show up. But even with a sparse turnout, these events are important for a number of reasons:

Connecting with readers:holding local events gives you a chance to connect with readers. In a world when we are usually so far apart from the authors, icons, celebrities, and leaders who influence us, being present and tangible still has value.

Connecting with booksellers: these are the people who, after all, have the power of recommendation when that wandering soul comes along an asks, “I’m looking for a good book. What do you recommend?” And if they’ve met you or know about your book, they are more likely to say, “Why, this new one from Whatever-Your-Name-Is is really good!”

Connecting with the location: and this step really requires media of all kinds: print, radio, television, and online. The beauty of being in a city is that you have the opportunity to capture media that prioritize LOCAL stories. You might be from Timbuctu, but you can pitch the local angle because you’re physically in town.

People need to see and hear about your book a number of times before they will buy it, according to studies. So when you blend radio and tv interviews, print and online reviews and features, and local events, you are giving your book the best chance of finding open eyes (and ears.)

Book tours aren’t necessarily for everyone, but have a chat with your publicist and see if they might be right for you.