Top Ten Do’s and Don’ts of PR

PR as an industry is always changing. As a cousin of the marketing industry, the rapid evolution of trends such as social media impact public relations. Instead of faxing press releases, for example, now we might tag a producer in a tweet about a client in a bid for his or her attention.

But even though you may pitch via infographic now instead of by fax, there are some evergreen Do’s and Don’ts of PR.

1. Always have a smile on your face when you place a call. It will show up in your voice. Smile while you type your pitch or follow up email as well (It will come through, I promise!)

2. Know exactly what you want to say and the result you want to get before the phone starts ringing or you hit send on that message.

3. Be authentic, enthusiastic, and friendly.

4. Don’t mail out something unless you have the time and energy to follow up with several phone calls, emails, or even social media messages. In other words, don’t make a promise you can’t keep.

5. Be prepared to send out material over and over again. In this business no news doesn’t mean “No,” it just means “Not Yet.” And it’s your job to turn that into a “Yes.”

6. Don’t call your media contact when he’s on deadline. Use your head, and don’t call the “News at Noon” producer at 12:10 pm when he’s swamped.

7. Listen for state of mind. If the person on the phone sounds busy, find out a better time to call. And then – this is key – call at that time! This lets her know you are considerate and can be counted on to do what you say you will.

8. Don’t take rejection personally. After all, if you don’t ask the answer is “No” automatically, but not every producer or editor will be able to say “Yes” to your pitch. It’s not about you, so just keep trying.

9. Be persistent without being obnoxious. Don’t be pushy or argumentative, just don’t give up without some effort. It’s often after the 5th or 10th contact that a producer finally gets around to answering your email or picking up the phone, and if you’d given up after just 1 you’d never get that relationship or that booking.

10. Become a resource by finding out what else your contact is working on and trying to help. Going above and beyond even in little ways will set you apart and solidify that contact in your database.

There you have it. These are time-tested, technology-immune rules for good PR. They are really rules for good living, too.

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